top of page

The internationally recognized authority in

VETERINARY CPR

recover-logo-250.png

What is RECOVER CPR​?

The goal of the Reevaluating Veterinary Resuscitation and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (RECOVER) is to provide current, evidence-based, uniform CPR guidelines for veterinary medicine, to disseminate these guidelines widely to raise the standard of care in emergency veterinary care, and to improve outcomes for dogs and cats suffering from cardiopulmonary arrest.

手続き

RECOVER

WEB Course

This is a web-based training course for veterinarians and veterinary nurses.

RECOVER WEB受付再開!

新システムへの意向が完了し、2/20より受付が再開されました。

RECOVER

Rescuer

Certification Course

Only those who have taken the web course and received certification are eligible.This hands-on, highly interactive course uses CPR mannequins and high-fidelity simulators that allow you to practice your clinical skills and decision-making in realistic scenarios.

RECOVER

Rescuer

Certification Course

Only those who have taken the web course and received certification are eligible.This hands-on, highly interactive course uses CPR mannequins and high-fidelity simulators that allow you to practice your clinical skills and decision-making in realistic scenarios.

前回のWEBコース受講が2年以上過ぎている方へは別メールにて2024年6月30日までのキャンペーンのお知らせを送っております。該当者でメールを受け取られていない方はお手数ですがページ下の問い合わせフォームかメール(info@javeccs.com)にてご連絡をお願いいたします。

The RECOVER WEB course and the Rescuer certification course sponsored by JaVECCS are conducted with the official approval of the Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society (VECCS) and the American College of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care (ACVECC) of the United States.

VECCS.png
Fletcher.jpg

Dr. Fletcher's Biography

Dr. Fretcher received his B.S. in Electrical Engineering from Drexel University, his Ph.D. in Biotechnology from the University of California, Berkeley/San Francisco, and his DVM from the University of California, Davis.
He then completed a small animal rotating internship and residency in emergency medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and became a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Emergency Critical Care.
He has been teaching at Cornell University since 2006 and has received numerous teaching awards, including the SUNY Chancellor's Teaching Excellence Award in 2013.
He is co-chair of the RECOVER Initiative, the first evidence-based veterinary CPR guidelines.
His research interests include fibrinolysis abnormalities, epilepsy, and the use of real-life simulation in education. He has created numerous simulators for veterinary education since 2009, and in the fall of 2015 opened the Center for Real-Life Simulation at Cornell University; Tetlow and Roy Park Innovation Lab. at Cornell University in the fall of 2015.

Why RECOVER?

I had a strong desire to establish a standard for training methods of CPR for veterinarians and veterinary technicians as in human medicine. So I contacted my colleague Dr. Manuel Boller, Veterinary Resuscitation Specialist, who at the time was working in a large CPR laboratory at the University of Pennsylvania, and asked him if he would be interested in working together.
He agreed, but informed me that the reality was that no one had yet attempted to establish the optimal method of CPR in dogs and cats.
So we decided to take the first step toward that end by creating guidelines, and RECOVER was born. 

bottom of page